The Market Says

Discussing the magazine market with my friend, she said there was a bigger market for ‘how to write’ especially in the speculative fiction field than there was for the fiction. She’s been researching for her own magazine, and I don’t doubt it.

But it’s a little funny, since in order to write for any genre you need to be familiar with the genre. Of course, they’re probably buying books instead of magazines, but why?

If we’re out for the short story market, it’s best to get our hands on the actual publication we want to have purchase our work. (I’m sure that’s best in every market.) Wouldn’t that make the demand equal for both products?

Are we trying to write in a vacuum?

Maybe we’re listening to the characters in our head. What’s to stop them from taking over the story? Not that it’s bad for them to take over the story, that’s part of what happens when they become real to the author. I guess I’m asking: How do we know they have the best plot possible, if we have nothing to compare to?

Not that we want to redo a plot. I know I’ve heard Twilight has a lot of similarities to Wuthering Heights (can’t be bad to be compared with a classic), but I wonder sometimes where the line can be drawn between using an old plot with newish characters, like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and the arguable every plot can be traced back to one of [insert number of plots below 50 you think there are].

Have you ever wondered what the true fascination with Zombies really is? I think if I get around to reading those re-makes, I’ll choose Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters instead…

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3 Comments

  1. Jamie said,

    20 May 2010 at 08:18

    I didn’t get the fascination with zombies until I read A Monster Within Idea by R. Thomas Riley (apex books) It was the scariest thing I have ever read in my life. It actually unnerved me to read some of the stories in that book. I have been reading horror for 25 years and writing it for the last15 and that hasn’t happened in a long time, not since Robert Bloch (he wrote Psycho).

    As far as the number of actual plots I had a professor do an analysis of any book we could come up with and he said that every plot could be traced back to Shakespeare. He made it work.

  2. ransomnoble said,

    20 May 2010 at 08:28

    Doesn’t that make you wonder where Shakespeare got them from?

  3. Jamie said,

    20 May 2010 at 08:36

    Probably from Chaucer who took from the oral tradition in place before him.


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