Screenwriting, continued…

A buddy of mine shared the link for Celtx, a free software to organize media projects. While it seems geared more toward scripts for plays or film, it also has a plain text editor, features for audio play, AV scripts like ads, music videos or documentaries, and even something for comic books.

It’s funny that it came up right after that conversation between my husband and I about screen writing. Another tool to try to tackle new challenges. It also has a community associated with it called Project Central that offers peer reviews and sneak previews for Celtx members.

I know in the book publishing world, if I can see it without logging in with a password it’s already considered ‘public’ and ‘published’ whether you got paid for it or not. If it’s the same for these other media, I think some of these users might not be happy that I can see it just by clicking. (I have not created an account there.) The only issue I saw with the software was it created a backup file on their secure server. I’d have to play more to see if it went public or if that was an option I set myself.

A year or two ago I wouldn’t have even considered that last option. Now it seems to be in the front of my mind anytime I share with someone. The best part of publishing, for me, is to share my stories with people I don’t even know.

Endless Possibilities

My husband had the helpful suggestion I ought to write scripts last night. His suggestion is all about the money he thinks I’d receive from the slight change in focus.

I reminded him I’ve never written a script. I think I wrote a play-style piece, once, when I was in fifth grade. That doesn’t count. I think it’d be a different thing entirely than the novels I’m slowly churning out.

But every time someone talks about a different medium, I am curious to try it. There’s something about a new challenge that makes it more interesting.

The suggestion came amidst a conversation about famous Iowans, Ashton Kutcher and Shawn Johnson were on a replay of a wrestling match on the Big Ten Network. I don’t think I need to write screenplays to be a famous Iowan, though. I’m sure novels could get me there, with time and patience and maybe a little luck.